2015 Archived Content

Medical Informatics World Conference Track #6 

Building Enterprise Architecture and Hospital Information Systems to Improve Outcomes

 

Delivering Data-Driven Infrastructures to Support Clinical and Financial Transformation

 

There are great demands on today’s Healthcare CIOs, CMIOs, CFOs, IT Heads and Medical Informaticists to simultaneously plan for the future to ensure business continuity while also being asked to derive improvements from their current data and systems. In a world of multiple clinical and financial systems and limited resources, how do you transition from a siloed organization with siloed systems, from a single Hospital Information System or CDSS to Data-Driven Enterprise Architectures? Cambridge Healthtech Institute and Clinical Informatics News' “Building Enterprise Architecture and Hospital Information Systems to Improve Outcomes: Delivering Data-Driven Infrastructures to Support Clinical and Financial Transformation,” taking place May 4-5, 2015 at the Renaissance Waterfront Hotel in Boston, MA, will bring together CIOs, CMIOs, IT and Finance Heads and Medical Informaticists from providers, payers, integrated delivery networks (IDN) and integrated delivery systems (IDS) for key discussions on improving quality measures and reimbursement rates with improved systems and analytics.


Day 1 | Day 2 

MONDAY, MAY 4

7:00 am Registration and Morning Coffee


KEYNOTE SESSION #1:
CURRENT AND FUTURE STATE OF HEALTHCARE REFORM, POLICY AND TECHNOLOGY
 

8:00 Organizer's Welcome and Chairperson's Remarks

Micah LiebermanMicah Lieberman, Executive Director, Conferences, Cambridge Healthtech Institute (CHI) and Medical Informatics World


Tariq Abu-Jaber, MA, MPH, Vice President, Medical Informatics, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Tariq Abu-Jaber, MA, MPH, Vice President, Medical Informatics, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care


8:10 Doing Care Differently: The Journey to a Healthier Nation

Phil PolakoffPhil Polakoff, M.D., National Health Advisor; US Surgeon General Nominee; former Advisor to US Senate Leadership and California Legislature

How can we deliver healthcare differently and lead all stakeholders to a healthier nation? An in-depth assessment of our current and future healthcare landscape and the impact health reform is having. A keener understanding as to the nature of the emerging innovative health delivery models and how best to navigate and implement them to achieve meaningful success.

8:40 Health IT, Health Reform, and the Path Forward

Steven StackSteven Stack, M.D., President-Elect, American Medical Association

The current healthcare environment brings seismic changes for physicians, from EHRs to telemedicine to implementation of the Affordable Care Act. The opportunity to improve patient care and safety through these and other changes is great, but so too are the challenges. This session will explore how recent legislative and regulatory requirements are impacting physicians and how technology can be leveraged to overcome existing challenges, increase efficiencies, and ultimately improve patient care.

9:10 The Coming Era of High Performance Medicine

Jason BurkeJason Burke, Senior Advisor for Innovation and Advanced Analytics, UNC Health Care and School of Medicine

Can medicine truly become a performance-driven industry? The complexity residing at the intersection between the science of medicine, the delivery of health care services, and natural patient variation has made it difficult to scale organizational performance beyond the effectiveness of individual contributors. Yet other fields such as space exploration, battlefield operations, meteorology, financial services, and automotive racing have demonstrated that comparably complex systems can be characterized and even managed to very high levels of performance. By adopting similar capabilities in the context of population health, accountable care, and personalized medicine, health and life sciences organizations can unlock a new era of clinical, financial, and operational high performance.

9:40 PANEL DISCUSSION: The Future of Healthcare Technology: Separating Wishful Thinking from Realistic Expectations


Tariq Abu-JaberModerator: Tariq Abu-Jaber, MA, MPH, Vice President, Medical Informatics, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care

Steven StackSteven Stack, M.D., President-Elect, American Medical Association

Jason BurkeJason Burke, Senior Advisor for Innovation and Advanced Analytics, UNC Health Care and School of Medicine

Phil PolakoffPhil Polakoff, M.D., National Health Advisor; US Surgeon General Nominee; former Advisor to US Senate Leadership and California Legislature


We all hear about potentially marvelous advances in healthcare technologies that will enable coordinated, efficient, high-quality care. But many organizations are struggling with incremental improvements to systems that woefully and evidently fail to fulfill well-acknowledged business requirements. Our expert panelists are working at the frontiers of what is possible and what is actual in healthcare IT and will offer their insights and prognostications as to what we can reasonably expect from technological advances in the coming years.

  • Looking at our interoperability challenges, and the un-integrated reality we are working in now, what are the biggest challenges we are facing in health IT today?
  • Looking beyond an individual hospital system or a State HIE, what do you believe to be the long-range technology developments that will enable needed transformations in the US healthcare system? What is a realistic timeline for these technologies not only to become generally available, but also generally deployed?
  • What are you working on now in your world to get us to this possible future state? What are your priority challenges to overcome in the immediate term (in the next year), medium term (3-5 years) and longer term?
  • Where are we wasting too much time and money, or investing in solutions that we will just have to replace as obsolete as soon as they are deployed? What is your advice for policy and health IT leaders in the field?
 

10:20 Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing


HOSPITAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS VS. ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE:
FINDING THE REAL DATA-DRIVEN INFRASTRUCTURES THAT SUPPORT CLINICAL AND FINANCIAL TRANSFORMATION
 

11:05 Chairperson’s Remarks  

Matthew BurtonMatthew Burton, M.D., Applied Clinical Informatics, Office of Information and Knowledge Management, Mayo Clinic  

 

 

11:10 The Double-Edged Sword of IDNs: A Long, Slow Climb to Value-Based Care

J.D. WhitlockJ.D. Whitlock, Vice President, Clinical & Business Intelligence, Mercy Health

IDNs are blessed and cursed in the (soon to be?) new world order of Value-Based Care. They have the scope and resources to transform themselves to meaningfully integrated care. But simultaneously they are typically hamstrung by conflicting financial incentives, sprawling legacy data architectures immune to quick fixes, and the same interoperability hurdles everyone else has. This presentation will examine the challenges and successes of a large Midwest IDN in the middle of this transition.

11:35 Do No Harm and the Cost of Quality Variation will Require Disruptive Analytics

Stephen AllegrettoStephen Allegretto, Vice President, Strategic Analytics and Financial Planning, Yale New Haven Health System

There are three key standalone data Systems that simply must be integrated to adequately protect our patients from harm while providing our patients the care they require to get better at an economically responsible cost. The cost of poor quality and waste is understood by every other industry. What stands in the way for healthcare to understand and reduce this variation: the current organizational ownership and expert knowledge structures supporting these data coupled with the inability to disrupt these ownership/knowledge structures. The traditional standalone information systems capturing these patient data include the EMR, Business Systems and the clinical quality registries. This presentation will explore YNHHS' efforts to disrupt these data silos for the benefit of the patient and their journey to get better. Practical applications of how these three systems and their data were integrated at the patient level to reduce unnecessary variation for concurrent, retrospective and predictive patient management, outcomes and resource utilization will be demonstrated.

12:00 pm Five Competencies for Designing a New Health Care Architecture

Jason BurkeJason Burke, Senior Advisor for Innovation and Advanced Analytics, UNC Health Care and School of Medicine

A modern health enterprise – where business and clinical decisions are powered by data – stands in stark contrast to the existing status quo across health and life sciences. Historical approaches to medical informatics are incapable of supporting the sophisticated insights needed to optimize the tradeoffs between health outcomes and costs, and between standardized medical treatment plans and more personalized care practices. The health industry’s technology lens is shifting from purely retrospective, presumptive, and practice-oriented policies towards collaborative, data-driven, predictive, patient-centered, and real-time engagement-oriented processes. To be effective, IT organizations will need more rigorous competencies in five key areas: enterprise architecture, data sciences (including advanced analytics), performance management, computing resource management, and agile methods.

Linguamatics12:25 Co-Presentation: Clinical NLP for Predictive Risk Models, Point of Care Insights and Patient Engagement: Challenges and Opportunities
Milward_DavidDavid Milward, Ph.D., CTO, Linguamatics 

Simon Beaulah, Director, Healthcare Strategy, Linguamatics
Vital patient insights essential to addressing rising costs, accountable care and meaningful use are trapped in unstructured text. New NLP approaches within HIT architectures are providing access to specific data buried in unstructured text to power predictive models (e.g. readmissions and pulmonary nodule), point of care insights and patient engagement. 

 

12:50 Luncheon Presentation (Sponsorship Opportunity Available) or Lunch on Your Own

1:30 Session Break


MOVING BEYOND THE HOSPITAL TO ACHIEVE DATA AND PROCESS INTEROPERABILITY 

2:05 Chairperson’s Remarks
Samuel “Sandy” AronsonSamuel “Sandy” Aronson, Executive Director, IT, Partners Healthcare Personalized Medicine 


2:10 The Healthcare Services Platform Consortium: An Opportunity to Foster Truly Interoperable Health Care Applications

Stanley HuffStanley Huff, M.D., Chief Medical Informatics Officer, Intermountain Information Systems


After more than a year of planning, the Health Services Platform Consortium (HSPC) has been incorporated as a non-profit entity consisting of providers and vendors that are dedicated to fostering the development and use of interoperable applications in health care. The primary strategy is to establish a middle tier of standards-based services for data access, privacy and role-based authentication of users along with other capabilities to support business process management and decision support. The HSPC has adopted the HL7 FHIR model for data access. It enables the EHR integration of SMART apps and also applications with additional functionality enabled by the expanded range of middle-tier services to be available.

Kingland2:35 The Necessary Foundation for Analytics
Gorball_JeffJeff Gorball, Certified Enterprise Data Management Expert (EDME), Kingland Systems Corporation
To achieve the objectives and benefits of data mining or predictive analytics, or simply meaningful use reporting, one must apply core data management principles and execute the activities in a disciplined fashion.  This presentation shows you how to leverage the Data Management Maturity (DMMSM) Model, released by the CMMI Institute last year, to ensure that you have the right foundation to support analytics or meet your other organizational objectives.

 


CambridgeSemantics3:00 Co-Presentation: Transforming Data Integration & Analysis in Provider-Payer-Pharma Data Collaboration with Smart Data
Prasad_AlokAlok Prasad, President, Cambridge Semantics






LaPointe_JimJim LaPointe, Managing Director, Cambridge Semantics






Payer-provider-pharma data collaboration. Sounds good in theory but hasn't been possible until now. Leading healthcare and life science organizations are discovering the transformative power of a smart data semantic platform to rapidly manage, extract, link and analyze data, while reducing cost of operations and speeding time to market. The time for data 'collaboration without coordination' has arrived.


 

3:25 Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing


INTERACTIVE BREAKOUT DISCUSSION GROUPS 

4:10 Find Your Table and Meet Your Moderator

4:15 Interactive Breakout Discussion Groups

Concurrent breakout discussion groups are interactive, guided discussions hosted by a facilitator or set of co-facilitators to discuss some of the key issues presented earlier in the day’s sessions. Delegates will join a table of interest and become an active part of the discussion at hand. To get the most out of this interactive session and format please come prepared to share examples from your work, vet some ideas with your peers, be a part of group interrogation and problem solving, and, most importantly, participate in active idea sharing.
View Discussion Group Details 

5:15 Networking Reception in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

6:15 Close of Day

6:20 - 9:00 pm Dinner Workshops (Separate registration required)

View Workshop Details 


Day 1 | Day 2

TUESDAY, MAY 5

8:20 am Morning Coffee


DESIGNING AN ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE IT STRATEGY: BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE, ADVANCED ANALYTICS, GOVERNANCE AND SECURITY
(special shared session between Tracks #4 and #6)
 

8:50 Chairperson’s Remarks
Stephen AllegrettoStephen Allegretto, Vice President, Strategic Analytics and Financial Planning, Yale New Haven Health System 


9:00 Hardwiring Clinical Evidence into Enterprise Architecture and Governance: Operations, Clinical and Finance

Evon HolladayEvon Holladay, Vice President, Enterprise Intelligence, Catholic Health Initiatives

If we were constructing a building we would not think of starting without an architectural diagram. Healthcare - operations and information systems rarely have this advantage. Come learn how a $15B healthcare system with multiple electronic health record systems is using governance and operational processes to hardwire clinical evidence - and building a bridge to financial and operational data.

9:25 Working Together: A Cross-Industry Collaboration Focused on Bringing the Benefits of Genetic Aware Clinical Decision Support to Everyone

Samuel “Sandy” AronsonSamuel “Sandy” Aronson, Executive Director, IT, Partners Healthcare Personalized Medicine

Truly genetics enabling the Electronic Health Record (EHR) ecosystem on a broad scale will require significant sustained collaboration between EHR vendors, Laboratory system vendors, Providers, Laboratories, Standards Bodies, Patient Advocates and Government. The Institution of Medicine has established an action collaborative that brings these groups together for the purpose of speeding the development of critical support. This talk will describe this effort, where it is currently focused, and the challenges and opportunities we face.

9:50 Designing an Enterprise Architecture IT Strategy: Ensuring Business Continuity, Enabling Access, Achieving Security

Roshan HussainRoshan Hussain, Director, Analytics & Public Reporting, Boston Medical Center

This presentation will share a story from the last 13 months wherein BMC went through a process of systems re-evaluation and business strategy development. The process included finance, IT, medical, privacy and other organizational leaders. When examining the risks to business continuity what criteria were used? What was the systems selection process? How were costs/ROI/legacy systems evaluated? Once investments in new systems were made and new process improvements were identified, what was the impact on the organization? The goal: to achieve business continuity for years to come and to effectively roll it out.

10:15 Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing


CASE STUDIES IN WORKFLOW AUTOMATION AND CLINICAL DECISION SUPPORT 

11:00 Co-Presentation: Workflow Optimization and Cognitive Support for Development and Delivery of Clinical Best Practices

William BriaWilliam Bria, M.D., CMIO, The HCI Group; President, AMDIS (Association of Medical Directors of Information Systems)





Matthew BurtonMatthew Burton, M.D., Applied Clinical Informatics, Office of Information and Knowledge Management, Mayo Clinic

There is an overwhelming need to provide the means and mechanisms for advanced practices to continually and consistently deliver the Next Best Practices. To do so, information and knowledge management tools must be fit to clinician mental models and integrate into optimized clinical workflows. Clinical informatics, design, software development, and systems engineering principles and best practices can be employed in the development of such systems. These systems may be conceptualized as components organized into a platform to enable or even catalyze practice redesign in the ultimate service of patients as well as their providers.

11:25 ARMADA (Advanced Research Management and Data Analysis): Protocol Management System For Early Phase Cancer Clinical Trials

Daniel KarpDaniel Karp, M.D., Professor of Medicine; Medical Director, Clinical and Translational Research Center, Investigational Cancer Therapeutics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

We have developed a working computer system that helps a high volume clinical research unit conduct cancer clinical trials in a more efficient and accurate way. The ARMADA Protocol Guidance System has had a major impact on drug development and patient care at MDACC: documenting complex requirements in real time, producing a complete list of all protocol requirements completed via a graphic interface, revolutionized clinical research as well as the billing process in MD Anderson CTRC with increased productivity and significant cost savings.

11:50 Diagnostic Imaging: A Paradigm for the Potential of Decision Support, Analytics and Enterprise Architecture in Health Care

Martin ReedMartin Reed, M.D., Radiologist, Diagnostic Imaging, Children's Hospital, Canada

Integrating decision support for diagnostic imaging into physicians’ workflow has been shown to change physicians’ practice. Analytics integrated into these systems can be used to assess and improve physicians’ performance. In this presentation I will review the work that has been done, including work done by the Canadian Association of Radiologists, on integrating decision support into computerized order entry systems for diagnostic imaging. I will discuss the current state of integrated decision support for diagnostic imaging. I will also discuss the role that integrated analytics can play in assessing and improving physicians’ performance and, referencing work being done in Canada and elsewhere, the potential for analytics for diagnostic imaging and other areas of medicine in an enterprise architecture to support clinical transformation and improved population health.

12:15 pm Luncheon Presentation (Sponsorship Opportunity Available) or Lunch on Your Own

1:00 Session Break


KEYNOTE SESSION #2:
LEVERAGING ANALYTICS AT THE INTERSECTION OF MEDICAL SCIENCE, HEALTHCARE DELIVERY, AND ECONOMICS
 

1:40 Organizer's and Chairperson's Remarks

Micah LiebermanMicah Lieberman, Executive Director, Conferences, Cambridge Healthtech Institute (CHI) and Medical Informatics World


Stanley Huff, M.D., Chief Medical Informatics Officer, Intermountain Information SystemsStanley Huff, M.D., Chief Medical Informatics Officer, Intermountain Information Systems 


1:50 The Confluence of Consumer Care and Two-Way Data: Apple HealthKit, Care Management, Patient/Family Engagement, Privacy

John HalamkaJohn Halamka, M.D., MS, CIO, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

With the launch of the Apple HealthKit we are seeing the consumerization of healthcare becoming a reality. What are the implications of this transformation for care management, patient/family engagement, and for privacy? With the confluence of consumer care and data where are the opportunities to better identify risk in populations and to improve quality? With the growth and availability of two-way data (to-from patients) what is the hope vs the hype of mobile tech?

2:20 Forecasting the Impact of HIT and e-Health on the Future Demand for Physicians

Jonathan WeinerJonathan Weiner, Dr.P.H., Professor, Health Policy & Management and Health Informatics; Director, Center for Population Health Information Technology (CPHIT), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Few factors will change the face of the American health care workforce as widely and dramatically as will health IT and e-health. This presentation explores how such applications will affect the future demand for physicians, and other clinicians. Professor Weiner will discuss the premise that HIT systems, when fully implemented, will allow care to be delivered by fewer physicians and more nurse practitioners and physician assistants. Furthermore, HIT-supported generalists could provide some care now delivered by specialists. Health IT could also help address rural clinician shortages patients by enabling care to be delivered remotely or asynchronously. Dr. Weiner will discuss the implications of these and other health informatics trends on what some believe to be a looming shortage of physicians.

2:50 Large Scale Health Data Sharing Case Study: Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Information and Technology

StephenWarrenStephen Warren, Executive in Charge and Chief Information Officer, Office of Information and Technology, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

VA is an industry leader in standardizing health information to enable interoperability between different systems. VA continually works to increase the ways we securely exchange Veteran health care information with key partners—primarily the Department of Defense (DoD)—to achieve seamless data sharing that improves the health care and customer service experience we deliver to Veterans. Our efforts include the ongoing innovation and evolution of our electronic health record (EHR) to create interoperability with DoD and other healthcare providers, and the expansion of partnership programs with public and private health care organizations that serve the Veteran population. VA has also established groundbreaking programs that share health data with Veterans themselves to empower them to take control of their own care. 

 

3:20 CAPSTONE PANEL DISCUSSION: What Can We Really do to Accelerate Value in Healthcare?


Eric GlazerModerator: Eric Glazer, Vice President, Physician Engagement & Social Media, Best Doctors

Jason BurkeJason Burke, Senior Advisor for Innovation and Advanced Analytics, UNC Health Care and School of Medicine

J.D. WhitlockJ.D. Whitlock, Vice President, Clinical & Business Intelligence, Mercy Health

Gowtham RaoGowtham Rao, M.D., Ph.D., Chief Medical Informatics Officer, BlueCross BlueShield of SC

StephenWarrenStephen Warren, Executive in Charge and Chief Information Officer, Office of Information and Technology, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs 

John HalamkaJohn Halamka, M.D., MS, CIO, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center


Our esteemed panel will summarize the key theme of the conference, how technology and analytics enable providers to better engage and manage patient populations, and ultimately achieve a higher quality at lower cost. Specifically, we will address strategies to transforming care models to shared risk using technologies. Areas of discussion will include:

  • Should we fire the CMO? Who are the ideal clinical leaders to drive this successful change?
  • How can provider organizations invest in the future without going broke today?
  • How does an ACO navigate the conflicting financial incentives?
  • What is the technology that can support ACOs?
  • How will we get to system wide Accountable Care in less than 10 years!?
 

3:55 Closing Remarks

4:00 Close of Conference



Day 1 | Day 2 

 


Parallel Conference Tracks: 

Track #1: Provider-Payer-Pharma Cross-Industry Data Collaboration
Track #2: Coordinated Patient Care, Engagement and Empowerment
Track #3: Population Health Management and Quality Improvement
Track #4: Security and Access of Healthcare Data
Track #5: Leveraging mHealth, Telehealth and the Cloud   
Track #6: Building Enterprise Architecture and Hospital Information Systems 

For questions or suggestions about the meeting, please contact: 

Micah Lieberman
Executive Director, Conferences
Cambridge Healthtech Institute (CHI) & Bio-IT World
T: (+1) 541.482.4709
E: mlieberman@healthtech.com 

For media and association partnerships, please contact: 

Kaushik (KC) Chaudhuri
Director of Product Marketing
Cambridge Healthtech Institute (CHI)
T: (+1) 781.972.5419
E: kchaudhuri@healthtech.com 

Jaime Hodges
Marketing Manager
Cambridge Healthtech Institute (CHI)
T: 781.972.5429
E: jhodges@healthtech.com 

For partnering and sponsorship information, please contact: 

Katelin Fitzgerald (Companies A-K)
Business Development Manager
Cambridge Healthtech Institute (CHI)
T: (+1) 781.972.5458
Mobile: (+1) 857.636.8188
E: kfitzgerald@healthtech.com 

Elizabeth Lemelin (Companies L-Z)
Business Development Manager
Cambridge Healthtech Institute (CHI)
T:  (+1) 781.972.1342
E: elemelin@healthtech.com